Azure MFA – ADFS Customisation

This post is part of a series, for the series contents see: Azure MFA

I’m building up my ADFS servers to have some infrastructure to use when playing about with MFA, so they’re not directly related to MFA just a stepping stone along the way.  This post stretches that a bit further: it has nothing to do with MFA but fits best within this series given how far along the ADFS build has come.

It’s just a quick post to customise my ADFS web front end so that it’s not so bland and generic by following the instructions in this Microsoft article.

Logo Customisation

The main rules here seem to be that your logo file should be:

  • 260×35 pixels
  • 96 DPI
  • No greater than 10KB

I say “rules” but actually you can push the boundaries on the sizes, you’ll just see a performance hit with screen size scaling (i.e for mobiles) or slower load times as it tries to pull down your image.

Anyway, I simply made up a logo file to specification (in PNG format) and then enabled it by running the following on my ADFS server:


Set-AdfsWebTheme `
-TargetName default `
-Logo @{path="c:\irankon_logo.png"}

And that is all that is needed.  You can actually create whole new themes to customise the look of the ADFS page whereas the one-liner above is simply modifying the default theme.

The result turned out like this:

ADFS Logo Change

Illustration Customisation

The other part I decided to customise was what Microsoft refers to as the “illustration” – the blue area to the right of my ADFS screen that you can see a bit of above.

The rules for this one (same reasons apply) are:

  • 1420×1080 pixels
  • 96 DPI
  • No greater than 200KB

I’m no artist myself so I grabbed a good image from phanroid.com, a nice bit of scenery in NES style 8-bit.  Then, sticking with the old school theme, I loaded it into good old MS Paint (not Paint 3D that they’re pushing everyone to use) and resized it to 1420×1080.

The resized image didn’t scale perfectly but it was good enough, however what wasn’t good enough was that the image was 1.3 MB in size.  Even if you can push the limits of Microsoft’s recommendations, 1.3 MB is simply too big for a page to have decent load time so I pumped the image into tinypng.com and got it down to a more sensible 230 KB.

With that done I set it as the image to use on my customised ADFS page with another PowerShell one-liner:


Set-AdfsWebTheme `
-TargetName default `
-Illustration @{path="c:\8-bit-illustration.png"}

Again, just modifying the default theme, this time the result was:

ADFS Illustration Change

 

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